Skip to content

How Ancient Chinese Cordyceps Sinensis Can Help Beat Diabetes

Ancient Chinese medicine has made use of a mushroom called Cordyceps sinensis for thousands of years. The mushroom also goes by the name Dong Chong Xia Cao and Caterpillar Fungus. It is basically an all-around health remedy that has been attributed with curing many illnesses.

One of the best uses for it is as an adaptogen which means it helps the body manage physical stress within the adrenal glands. It also contains powerful antioxidants. It is believed to shrink cancerous tumors and regulate irregular heartbeats.

One of the most impressive uses of the mushroom in capsule format is that of treating diabetes. Studies have been done with animals which show promise that it can improve if not treat both types of diabetes.

The animals were given the mushroom and then their plasma glucose levels were measured. It appears that the mushroom reduced the levels of glucose in diabetic animals. Specifically, the animals were given the mycelium and fruit of the mushroom. It turned out that in addition to experiencing lower glucose levels, they experienced less hyperglycemia.



That is not all. The animals also ate and drank less. The cordyceps sinensis helped improve the animals' condition on these levels as well. Upon closer examination, the mushroom brought the levels of glucose down by isolating a chemical called polysaccharide.

In addition, the most promising results from the animal studies were a clear reduction of oxidative stress. Glucose regulating enzymes in the liver were improved and insulin secretion was also improved. It seems that if these studies show diabetes can be brought under control in animals, then most certainly there is promise in humans.

Most Cordyceps sinensis is found in high altitudes. It can be very expensive to buy the actual plant. Instead, most people who wish to take it as a diabetes supplement will want to purchase it from an herbal or health food store. There are many potent formulas available in capsule formats and they often include other healthy ingredients to promote well being.

The best thing is to choose a formula that is designed for sufferers of Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. There are a lot of cordyceps supplements available on the market , but not all are of the best quality. Be sure to ask a knowledgeable staff member at any brick and mortar health food store about the best formula for diabetes.

Exercise is also essential for losing weight, which is a big symptom of Type 2 diabetes. When used, the cordyceps can increase a person's endurance when exercising helping them to lose excess pounds which further improves the diabetic's condition.

Take the supplement exactly as directed. Taking it without eating right and exercising is not advised. This is not a magic potion that will get rid of diabetes. It is essential to practice taking the right steps to treating the disease. Never stop an insulin medication without speaking to a doctor.

Take it under a doctor's supervision. This way, the results can be observed and noted.

Choosing A Brain Injury Claims Lawyer

Brain injury is one of the most devastating outcomes of an accident. In the most extreme cases, brain injury can leave one in a coma or a persistent vegetative state. This is a state where the victim is unable to regain consciousness and brain activity becomes low. In such cases, hospitalization is usually the only option. However, in cases where the injury is mild, the victim may lose the ability to remember things that were said just a few moments previously, but function normally in all other aspects.

While medical experts continue to carry out detailed research on the brain, at this time, it's still the least understood of all body organs. The brain is the most complex, fragile and vital part of the human body and the effects experienced in case of an injury will depend on the areas of the brain that have sustained the damage or injury.

Getting Compensation From An Accident Involving Head Or Brain Injury

If a loved one has suffered from head or brain injury due to negligence by another person, they have a right to claim compensation. The awarded funds will sponsor the ongoing care of the victim, and this enables the family to attain the best possible quality of life despite the incident. This is where professional advice from a brain injury claims lawyer with vast experience in managing and handling such cases is essential.

Issues regarding compensation tend to be sophisticated. If the claim procedures used to make an injury compensation case are not enough to provide lifelong care for the affected, there's no chance to go back and ask the courts for more funds at a future date even if the compensation amount proves to be inadequate.

A firm of lawyers who specialize in head and brain injury will do more than just simply fighting the case for your loved one in court. A personal injury lawyer specializing in brain injury claims will also offer a huge array of managed care solutions that include sourcing as well as managing expert staff and equipment for home care when required. Moreover, the firm will provide a care manager to assist with day to day living requirements of a loved with who has suffered a brain injury.

This kind of assistance and support will be available before and after the compensation claim case has been heard and is usually provided free of charge. Keep in mind that some cases take up to five years to reach a verdict and so, it is a critical consideration.



If you are reading this post because your loved one has a had a severe injury and are looking for further information, an excellent way to asses the practical experience of any potential brain injury claims lawyer is to take a look at their website. Based on the site's content, especially the case histories and testimonials, it should be fairly easy to know whether the firm specializes in serious injury cases, and if they have a successful track record in dealing with them. Brain injury doesn't have to be a life sentence for the entire family.

Keeping Safe In An Assisted Living Scottsdale Facility

Scottsdale, Arizona is nicknamed The Wests Most Western Town. Known for its late night and hotel scenes, its also home to many assisted living facilities. Scottsdale is not one of the most populated cities in the West Coast with a population of only around 230,500 people.

It is known for its comfortable and healthy assisted living facilities. Some facilities have taken it a step further and have constructed private villages for senior citizens. These places are complete with all the amenities including shopping and entertainment centers.

Assisted living Scottsdale has become a flourishing industry and many flock to retire there. For a senior who has chosen to live in an assisted living facility, its important that he not only feels comfortable but is also safe.



Here are some ways that a person can ensure that their senior loved one stays safe while in the assisted living Scottsdale facility.

* Keeping clutter free A senior need to be careful when moving about the facility and his room. A person visiting his senior loved one could help by removing or moving anything that could cause his loved one to trip or fall. Electrical or extension cords, small stools, or any trash on the floor are the usual culprits.

* Checking a seniors daily routine In assisted living Scottsdale facilities, staff members are there to help if a senior is having difficulty in any tasks. Observing and checking to see if a senior can get through the daily routine without any mishaps is important. If a senior loved one needs help doing even the most basic this as eating, drinking, dressing, and other grooming habits, it is best to make prior arrangements with the staff for regular assistance. Its also important for a person to check if his senior loved one has easy access to a call-for-help button. He should check if theres a button within easy reach from the bed or any other sitting places. Some assisted living Scottsdale facilities have buttons that could be worn around the wrist or the neck.

* Talk about emergency plans or other evacuation procedures Staff members should discuss any emergency procedures with the residents of the assisted living Scottsdale facility. A person should ask his senior loved one if he knows these procedures and also ask the staff members the step-by-step process. It would also be good to discuss these procedures with the senior from time to time. Some people also take time to practice these procedures with their senior loved ones.

Panic Attacks Symptoms, Causes And Treatment

A panic attack is a sudden feeling of overwhelming fear and anxiety that strikes without warning. People who have had a panic attack report feeling like they are having a heart attack or that they are dying or losing their mind. The terror and sense of impending doom that they experience during a panic attack are not related to what is happening around them and often have no basis in reality. Left untreated, panic attacks can worsen and lead to panic disorder.

You will find great resources at this website on panic attack symptoms and coping techniques.

When Panic Attacks

Panic attacks can strike anywhere and at any time. They often occur when a person is away from home. People have had panic attacks while driving, sitting in a plane, working, doing their grocery shopping, having dinner with friends, exercising at the gym, and even while sleeping.

How Long It Lasts

The symptoms of a panic attack progress rapidly, reaching their peak in about 10 minutes. Most panic attacks are brief and are over within 20 to 30 minutes, though - rarely - the symptoms could last for more than an hour.

The Symptoms

A full-blown panic attack usually includes a combination of four or more of these symptoms:

  • Shortness of breath
  • Racing or pounding heart, palpitations, accelerated heart rate
  • Shortness of breath, hyperventilation
  • Chest pain or discomfort
  • Feeling faint or weak
  • Dizziness or light-headedness
  • Nausea
  • Trembling or shaking
  • Sweating
  • Chills
  • Hot or cold flashes
  • Numbness
  • Tingling sensations in the hands and/or feet
  • A choking feeling
  • Abdominal distress
  • A sense of terror or doom
  • A feeling that one is about to die or go crazy
  • A feeling of being detached from oneself
  • A feeling that one is about to lose control

Panic Attack Vs. Panic Disorder

When panic attacks occur repeatedly and there is fear that an episode could occur at any time, a person may be diagnosed with panic disorder. People with panic disorder are often extremely fearful and anxious because they are unable to predict when their next panic attack will occur. Panic disorders are common. About 6 million adults in the US are currently living with this condition. The symptoms of panic disorder usually begin in adolescence or early adulthood. Women are twice as likely as men to be diagnosed with panic disorder.

Am I Having a Heart Attack?

Because many of its symptoms are physical and because these symptoms can often be severe, people experiencing a panic attack often worry that they are having a heart attack. In fact, thousands of people suffering panic attacks go to the ER every day in fear that they have a life-threatening emergency. But while any chest pain, heart palpitation, and labored breathing should be checked by a doctor, it is also important to keep in mind that panic attacks are often an overlooked cause of chest pain and that this may lead to a cardiac misdiagnosis.

Know the Causes

Though scientists have found that the tendency to experience panic attacks tends to run in families, modern medical science is yet to pinpoint the exact causes of panic attacks. However, it has been observed that major life transitions such as getting married, having children, graduating, and moving into a new home seem to trigger panic attacks. Events that are particularly stressful such as getting divorced, the death of a loved one, and losing one's job can also set off a panic attack.

In some rare cases, panic attacks can be caused by medical conditions. A person experiencing recurring panic attacks, should see a doctor to rule out the following physical causes:

  • Hypoglycaemia
  • Hyperthyroidism
  • Mitral valve prolapse
  • Stimulant use
  • Medication withdrawal

Treatment

Panic attacks and panic disorder can be treated successfully with therapy sessions, medication, and self-help strategies. Forms of therapy for panic attacks and panic disorder include cognitive behavioral therapy and exposure therapy. Cognitive behavioral therapy addresses the behaviors and thinking patterns that trigger and/or sustain panic attacks. It is generally considered as the most effective treatment for panic attacks. Exposure therapy teaches patients how to cope with panic attacks by inducing a panic attack in a safe and controlled environment.

Medication can temporarily reduce or control the symptoms of a panic attack or panic disorder. Antidepressants have to be taken continuously, not only during a panic attack, while benzodiazepines or anti-anxiety drugs act rapidly and are taken during an episode. However, benzodiazepines are often highly addictive and should be used with caution.

DrugFacts: Understanding Drug Abuse and Addiction

Many people do not understand why or how other people become addicted to drugs. It is often mistakenly assumed that drug abusers lack moral principles or willpower and that they could stop using drugs simply by choosing to change their behavior. In reality, drug addiction is a complex disease, and quitting takes more than good intentions or a strong will. In fact, because drugs change the brain in ways that foster compulsive drug abuse, quitting is difficult, even for those who are ready to do so. Through scientific advances, we know more about how drugs work in the brain than ever, and we also know that drug addiction can be successfully treated to help people stop abusing drugs and lead productive lives.
Drug abuse and addiction have negative consequences for individuals and for society. Estimates of the total overall costs of substance abuse in the United States, including productivity and health- and crime-related costs, exceed $600 billion annually. This includes approximately $193 billion for illicit drugs,1 $193 billion for tobacco,2 and $235 billion for alcohol.3 As staggering as these numbers are, they do not fully describe the breadth of destructive public health and safety implications of drug abuse and addiction, such as family disintegration, loss of employment, failure in school, domestic violence, and child abuse.
What Is Drug Addiction?
Addiction is a chronic, often relapsing brain disease that causes compulsive drug seeking and use, despite harmful consequences to the addicted individual and to those around him or her. Although the initial decision to take drugs is voluntary for most people, the brain changes that occur over time challenge an addicted person’s self-control and hamper his or her ability to resist intense impulses to take drugs.
Fortunately, treatments are available to help people counter addiction’s powerful disruptive effects. Research shows that combining addiction treatment medications with behavioral therapy is the best way to ensure success for most patients. Treatment approaches that are tailored to each patient’s drug abuse patterns and any co-occurring medical, psychiatric, and social problems can lead to sustained recovery and a life without drug abuse.
Similar to other chronic, relapsing diseases, such as diabetes, asthma, or heart disease, drug addiction can be managed successfully. And as with other chronic diseases, it is not uncommon for a person to relapse and begin abusing drugs again. Relapse, however, does not signal treatment failure—rather, it indicates that treatment should be reinstated or adjusted or that an alternative treatment is needed to help the individual regain control and recover. What Happens to Your Brain When You Take Drugs?
Drugs contain chemicals that tap into the brain’s communication system and disrupt the way nerve cells normally send, receive, and process information. There are at least two ways that drugs cause this disruption: (1) by imitating the brain’s natural chemical messengers and (2) by overstimulating the “reward circuit” of the brain.
Some drugs (e.g., marijuana and heroin) have a similar structure to chemical messengers called neurotransmitters, which are naturally produced by the brain. This similarity allows the drugs to “fool” the brain’s receptors and activate nerve cells to send abnormal messages.
Other drugs, such as cocaine or methamphetamine, can cause the nerve cells to release abnormally large amounts of natural neurotransmitters (mainly dopamine) or to prevent the normal recycling of these brain chemicals, which is needed to shut off the signaling between neurons. The result is a brain awash in dopamine, a neurotransmitter present in brain regions that control movement, emotion, motivation, and feelings of pleasure. The overstimulation of this reward system, which normally responds to natural behaviors linked to survival (eating, spending time with loved ones, etc.), produces euphoric effects in response to psychoactive drugs. This reaction sets in motion a reinforcing pattern that “teaches” people to repeat the rewarding behavior of abusing drugs.
As a person continues to abuse drugs, the brain adapts to the overwhelming surges in dopamine by producing less dopamine or by reducing the number of dopamine receptors in the reward circuit. The result is a lessening of dopamine’s impact on the reward circuit, which reduces the abuser’s ability to enjoy not only the drugs but also other events in life that previously brought pleasure. This decrease compels the addicted person to keep abusing drugs in an attempt to bring the dopamine function back to normal, but now larger amounts of the drug are required to achieve the same dopamine high—an effect known as tolerance.
Long-term abuse causes changes in other brain chemical systems and circuits as well. Glutamate is a neurotransmitter that influences the reward circuit and the ability to learn. When the optimal concentration of glutamate is altered by drug abuse, the brain attempts to compensate, which can impair cognitive function. Brain imaging studies of drug-addicted individuals show changes in areas of the brain that are critical to judgment, decision making, learning and memory, and behavior control. Together, these changes can drive an abuser to seek out and take drugs compulsively despite adverse, even devastating consequences—that is the nature of addiction.
Why Do Some People Become Addicted While Others Do Not?
No single factor can predict whether a person will become addicted to drugs. Risk for addiction is influenced by a combination of factors that include individual biology, social environment, and age or stage of development. The more risk factors an individual has, the greater the chance that taking drugs can lead to addiction. For example:
Biology. The genes that people are born with—in combination with environmental influences—account for about half of their addiction vulnerability. Additionally, gender, ethnicity, and the presence of other mental disorders may influence risk for drug abuse and addiction.
Environment. A person’s environment includes many different influences, from family and friends to socioeconomic status and quality of life in general. Factors such as peer pressure, physical and sexual abuse, stress, and quality of parenting can greatly influence the occurrence of drug abuse and the escalation to addiction in a person’s life.
Development. Genetic and environmental factors interact with critical developmental stages in a person’s life to affect addiction vulnerability. Although taking drugs at any age can lead to addiction, the earlier that drug use begins, the more likely it will progress to more serious abuse, which poses a special challenge to adolescents. Because areas in their brains that govern decision making, judgment, and self-control are still developing, adolescents may be especially prone to risk-taking behaviors, including trying drugs of abuse.
Prevention Is the Key
Drug addiction is a preventable disease. Results from NIDA-funded research have shown that prevention programs involving families, schools, communities, and the media are effective in reducing drug abuse. Although many events and cultural factors affect drug abuse trends, when youths perceive drug abuse as harmful, they reduce their drug taking. Thus, education and outreach are key in helping youth and the general public understand the risks of drug abuse. Teachers, parents, and medical and public health professionals must keep sending the message that drug addiction can be prevented if one never abuses drugs.